Danny speaks about pet welfare: 'They just want to be happy day by day'


Pet Welfare
“Animals don’t have a desire to live a long life, they don’t want to make it to Christmas or someone’s birthday or to be 10 years older. They just want to be happy day by day.”
“I hope people don’t feel guilty for not being wealthy enough to try advanced procedures when the reality is that pets are quite happy when given the best treatment you can afford.”

While veterinary science has made impressive advances in recent years, allowing many pets to be healthier for longer, vets say extending an animal’s life at all costs is not always the best option for them, and can result in bills of thousands of pounds for their owners.

Danny Chambers, a vet in Hampshire who runs a phone-in on BBC Radio Devon, said: “There are some situations where for the welfare of the animal, euthanasia would be appropriate to end the suffering. If you’re going to put them through quite complex surgery which has many months’ recovery time with complications, there is an ethical discussion to be had around that.”

Chambers cited the example of a person undergoing chemotherapy. Although it is a long and painful process, humans are able to rationalise suffering as a means to get better, or to enable them to spend time with family or to do things they’ve dreamed of. “Animals don’t have a desire to live a long life, they don’t want to make it to Christmas or someone’s birthday or to be 10 years older. They just want to be happy day by day.”

He said most vets were able to give a list of three to five options for treatment plans, and owners should not feel as if they have to choose the most expensive one if they can’t afford it, especially since it won’t always be best for the animal’s welfare.

“I hope people don’t feel guilty for not being wealthy enough to try these advanced procedures when the reality is that dogs are quite happy when given the best treatment you can afford.”

Read more in The Guardian: Too many pets kept alive when it’s not the kindest option, say vets | Pets | The Guardian


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